• Vol 10, No 5 (2019)
  • Chemical Engineering

Cycle Tempo Power Simulation of the Variations in Heat Source Temperatures for an Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plant using R-134A Working Fluid

Muswar Muslim, Muhammad Idrus Alhamid, Nasruddin Nasruddin, Muhamad Yulianto, Edi Marzuki

Corresponding email: muswar_2000@yahoo.com


Cite this article as:
Muslim, M., Alhamid, M.I., Nasruddin, N., Yulianto, M., Marzuki, E., 2019. Cycle Tempo Power Simulation of the Variations in Heat Source Temperatures for an Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plant using R-134A Working Fluid. International Journal of Technology. Volume 10(5), pp. 979-987
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Muswar Muslim -Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok, Depok 16424, Indonesia -Department. of Marine System Engineering, Darma Persada University, Jakar
Muhammad Idrus Alhamid Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok, Depok 16424, Indonesia
Nasruddin Nasruddin Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok, Depok 16424, Indonesia
Muhamad Yulianto Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok, Depok 16424, Indonesia
Edi Marzuki Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok, Depok 16424, Indonesia
Email to Corresponding Author

Abstract
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The focus of this study is an experiment and simulation of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system to produce electricity. The experimental equipment consisted of four main components: fluid pumps (for refrigerant and water); a condenser as a heat exchanger to condense the working fluid; an evaporator (boiler) as a heat exchanger to evaporate the refrigerant; and an expander (turbine) as a driver to produce electricity. The expander was a modification of a scroll air conditioning (AC) compressor, with a capacity of 1-3 kilowatts and connected to the generator to produce electricity in line with the design estimate. Furthermore, based on the application of the ORC experiment in the form of a small-scale power plant, a pre-determined temperature setting was set for the heat source, ranging between 80 and 100oC. The working fluid used in the study was R-134a. Optimum power estimation was obtained by processing the experimental result data using a software cycle tempo simulation that measured several electrical power outputs between 1.76 and 2.74 kilowatts.

Expander; Evaporator; Condenser; Cycle Tempo; Organic Rankine Cycle

Introduction

Development research on small-scale electricity generation using Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system technology has become increasingly prevalent, as seen in the rise in scientific articles on ORC research worldwide. For example, researchers from Belgium, Quoilin et al. (2010), examined the power plant of an ORC system with HCFC-123 working fluid by performing calculation analysis using a numerical system. Chinese researchers Shao et al. (2017) investigated an ORC power plant that also used R-123 as the working fluid on the micro radial flow turbine. Other researchers from Thailand, Sonsaree et al. (2018), examined an ORC integrated with a solar collector as a heat source. A further study by Amicabile et al. (2015) used exhaust heat from diesel engines as a heat source. It is apparent that experiments related to developing ORC for small-scale plant applications have attracted the attention of enthusiastic scientists all around the world. An ORC plant review by Muslim et al. (2015) explains the development of test rigs from the ORC system, while further research by Muslim et al. (2017) focused on the design of the dimensions of the reservoir required to produce hot water to evaporate the working fluid in the evaporator.  Riyanto and Martowibowo (2015) researched the  use  of electricity generators was based on the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system. The purpose of this paper is to establish how much electricity an ORC power plant system uses by employing a cycle tempo simulation program. From the design, based on the results of experiments conducted on the focus of measurement of the main components of the ORC system, it is evident that the evaporator is one of the important components of the ORC system for the production of pressurized working vapor. This allows the pressurized steam to rotate the expander, which is a coupling gen-set for producing electricity. In this field of ORC study, several researchers have conducted ORC generation system experiments by using and modifying a scroll compressor of air conditioning (AC) in car as an expander, employing R-245fa working fluid in the case of Gao et al. (2015) and Ziviani et al. (2014), and R-123 in the case of Wu et al. (2015) and Miao et al. (2015). In this research, the expander from the modification of the scroll AC compressor is used for cooling land vehicles. This study aims to determine the level of thermal efficiency achieved in the experiment. Its originality is the selection of an expander using a Sanden TRSE09 with R-134a working fluid, which is more environmentally friendly.

Acknowledgement

The publication of this article was supported by Universitas Darma Persada through SK Rektor number 39/KPTS/UNSADA/IX/2017.

 

Supplementary Material
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