• Vol 7, No 7 (2016)
  • Civil Engineering

Cross-cultural Differences in Speeding Intentions of Drivers on Urban Road Environments in Asian Developing Countries

Phongphan Tankasem, Thaned Satiennam, Wichuda Satiennam


Publish at : 30 Dec 2016 - 00:00
IJtech : IJtech Vol 7, No 7 (2016)
DOI : https://doi.org/10.14716/ijtech.v7i7.4701

Cite this article as:
Tankasem, P.., & Satiennam, T..& Satiennam, W.. 2016. Cross-cultural Differences in Speeding Intentions of Drivers on Urban Road Environments in Asian Developing Countries. International Journal of Technology. Volume 7(7), pp.1187-1195
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Phongphan Tankasem Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002, Thailand
Thaned Satiennam Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002, Thailand
Wichuda Satiennam Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002, Thailand
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Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine and compare the psychological factors influencing driver speeding behavior in 3 cities in Southeast Asia, focusing on developing counties, using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). Data was collected from 570 respondents in the urban areas of Khon Kaen in Thailand, Vientiane in Laos and Phnom Penh in Cambodia. The psychological factors of TPB include attitude (AT), subjective norm (SN) and perceived behavioral control (PBC). These factors were employed to explain speeding intentions in urban road environments. The Structural Equation Models (SEM) was used to examine and explain speeding intentions. The results indicated that the TPB could explain the variance by intentions of drivers in Khon Kaen, Vientiane and Phnom Penh at 33%, 46%, and 84%, respectively. The most significant of the psychological factors for Khon Kaen drivers was determined by AT, while the speeding intentions of Vientiane drivers and Phnom Penh drivers were determined by PBC. From this data, the authorities of each city should create and implement safety policies that can improve these psychological factors, which could have a positive effect on drivers’speeding intentions in urban road environments. The outcome of this study could be useful for understanding the speeding attitudes of drivers in three different countries and would be beneficial for the development and introduction of preventative safety measures in these countries as well.


Asian Developing countries; Intention; Theory of Planned Behaviour; Urban Speeding