• Vol 9, No 7 (2018)
  • Architecture

Land Ecological Enhancement, Greenship Neighborhood 1.0: A Theoretical and Concept Study into the Design Framework of a Sustainable Built Environment

Sarah Luziani, Beta Paramita


Cite this article as:
Luziani, S., Paramita, B. 2018. Land Ecological Enhancement, Greenship Neighborhood 1.0: A Theoretical and Concept Study into the Design Framework of a Sustainable Built Environment . International Journal of Technology. Volume 9(7), pp. 1450-1459
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Sarah Luziani Department of Architecture, Faculty of Technology and Vocational Education, Indonesian University of Education, Bandung 40154, Indonesia
Beta Paramita Department of Architecture, Faculty of Technology and Vocational Education, Indonesian University of Education, Bandung 40154, Indonesia
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Abstract
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Greater Bandung is the third largest metropolitan city in Indonesia. The population growth of Bandung, recorded as 0.37 p.a, makes a significant contribution to the physical development of the city (BPS Bandung City, 2016). Nevertheless, a non-integrated regional planning and design oriented to economic growth points to environmental degradation, which then contributes to several urban hazards. Kementerian Lingkungan Hidup dan Kehutanan Republik Indonesia (2016), launched its IKLH (Environmental Quality Index) in 2016. Indicators for assessing IKLH are based on the Air Pollution Index (30%), Water Pollution Index (30%), and Green Coverage Index (40%). The score for normal IKLH is above 67, while the score for Bandung declined from 2011 to 2014, with results of 50.49, 48.37, 47.80, and 45.06. This rating scale means that the region is in a state of alert. The lowest score in Bandung relates to green coverage. Air pollution conditions have also deteriorated from year to year, and the index decreased drastically, from 71.03 to 59.24. (Kementerian Lingkungan Hidup dan Kehutanan RI, 2016).

The Bandung government has established the RTRW (Bandung City Regional Spatial Plan) 2011–2031 (Pemerintah Kota Bandung, 2011), stated in the Regional Regulation of Bandung City No. 18 of 2011. There are two city service centers (PPKs): PPK Alun-alun and PPK Gedebage. Those PPKs must provide adequate infrastructure and facilities to serve the whole city and regional area. Thus, PPK Gedebage becomes our focus, since this area is the new extension of Eastern Bandung development and is mentioned in the Gedebage masterplan (Rencana Induk Kawasan Gedebage, RIKG). In principle, the planning of the Gedebage area aims to reduce the burden of activity and traffic in the center of Bandung, which has reached its maximum capacity. The Gedebage area was developed to reduce the burden of activity and traffic in the center of Bandung, which has also reached its maximum capacity. Commercial and service functions (21.8%) occupy the third largest portion of the total area, after settlements (27.6%) and infrastructure (25.1%). RIKG has included the intensity of land use through the building coverage ratio (BCR), floor area ratio (FAR), and green coverage. RIKG has also provided guidance on flood control systems, drainage systems, and infiltration wells, while other planning provisions have not been regulated.

In the city of Bandung, there are already binding regulations related to buildings and sustainable areas, as outlined in Perwal (Mayor Regulation) No. 1023 of 2016. In the regulation, the construction must consider harmony with the building’s environment in terms of social, cultural, and ecosystem elements. This requirement relates to buildings with a building floor area of at least 5000 m2 (Kementerian Pekerjaan Umum dan Perumahan Rakyat Republik Indonesia, 2015). This Perwal intended to control the city development which is increasingly tend to explore the natural resources based on commercial demand basis neglecting the environmental aspects.  The masterplan design, somehow has not been designed integrated with the aspects of ecological enhancement. By focuses on maintaining the harmony and balance of the environmental ecosystem, improving the quality of a healthy environment, and greatly minimizing the opening of new land. As a result, the land used can be efficient and maintain a natural balance.

Technology innovation plays a critical role in expediting transition to a sustainable mode of development and it becomes an important instrument to increase the flow of new ideas and next-generation products (Berawi, 2018). Thus, this study aims to explore the theoretical aspects of Greenship Neighborhood 1.0 (Greenship, 2015) as new innovation as benchmark tools, through LEE parameters. The synthesis of parameter later will be used as the design guidelines. To determine the rating/certification as a benchmark, the extent of the application of ecological enhancement criteria in this commercial area is used as a rating tool issued by the Green Building Council Indonesia (GBCI), and the benchmark tool is called Greenship. 

Gedebage masterplan; Greenship neighborhood 1.0; Sustainable built environment

Introduction

Greater Bandung is the third largest metropolitan city in Indonesia. The population growth of Bandung, recorded as 0.37 p.a, makes a significant contribution to the physical development of the city (BPS Kota Bandung, 2016). Nevertheless, a non-integrated regional planning and design oriented to economic growth points to environmental degradation, which then contributes to several urban hazards. Kemen LHK RI (2016), launched its IKLH (Environmental Quality Index) in 2016. Indicators for assessing IKLH are based on the Air Pollution Index (30%), Water Pollution Index (30%), and Green Coverage Index (40%). The score for normal IKLH is above 67, while the score for Bandung declined from 2011 to 2014, with results of 50.49, 48.37, 47.80, and 45.06. This rating scale means that the region is in a state of alert. The lowest score in Bandung relates to green coverage. Air pollution conditions have also deteriorated from year to year, and the index decreased drastically, from 71.03 to 59.24. (Kemen LHK RI, 2016).

The Bandung government has established the RTRW (Bandung City Regional Spatial Plan) 2011–2031 (Pemkot Bandung, 2011), stated in the Regional Regulation of Bandung City No. 18 of 2011. There are two city service centers (PPKs): PPK Alun-alun and PPK Gedebage. Those PPKs must provide adequate infrastructure and facilities to serve the whole city and regional area. Thus, PPK Gedebage becomes our focus, since this area is the new extension of Eastern Bandung development and is mentioned in the Gedebage masterplan (Rencana Induk Kawasan Gedebage, RIKG). In principle, the planning of the Gedebage area aims to reduce the burden of activity and traffic in the center of Bandung, which has reached its maximum capacity. The Gedebage area was developed to reduce the burden of activity and traffic in the center of Bandung, which has also reached its maximum capacity. Commercial and service functions (21.8%) occupy the third largest portion of the total area, after settlements (27.6%) and infrastructure (25.1%). RIKG has included the intensity of land use through the building coverage ratio (BCR), floor area ratio (FAR), and green coverage. RIKG has also provided guidance on flood control systems, drainage systems, and infiltration wells, while other planning provisions have not been regulated.

In the city of Bandung, there are already binding regulations related to buildings and sustainable areas, as outlined in Perwal (Mayor Regulation) No. 1023 of 2016. In the regulation, the construction must consider harmony with the building’s environment in terms of social, cultural, and ecosystem elements. This requirement relates to buildings with a building floor area of at least 5000 m2 (Kemen PUPR RI, 2015). This Perwal intended to control the city development which is increasingly tend to explore the natural resources based on commercial demand basis neglecting the environmental aspects.  The masterplan design, somehow has not been designed integrated with the aspects of ecological enhancement. By focuses on maintaining the harmony and balance of the environmental ecosystem, improving the quality of a healthy environment, and greatly minimizing the opening of new land. As a result, the land used can be efficient and maintain a natural balance.

Technology innovation plays a critical role in expediting transition to a sustainable mode of development and it becomes an important instrument to increase the flow of new ideas and next-generation products (Berawi, 2018). Thus, this study aims to explore the theoretical aspects of Greenship Neighborhood 1.0 (Greenship, 2015) as new innovation as benchmark tools, through LEE parameters. The synthesis of parameter later will be used as the design guidelines. To determine the rating/certification as a benchmark, the extent of the application of ecological enhancement criteria in this commercial area is used as a rating tool issued by the Green Building Council Indonesia (GBCI), and the benchmark tool is called Greenship. 

Conclusion

The use of LEE – Greenship Neighborhood 1.0 as the theoretical to break down the concept and then applied to the design synthesis has proven beneficial to the sustainable built environment. The results of the design of the CBD Gedebage masterplan area were objectively assessed using the Greenship Neighborhood Version 1.0 rating with an LEE category score of 14 out of 19, representing a percentage of 73% out of 100%. The LEE parameter emphasizing that the most important thing is to respond and appreciate the existing environment for ecosystem balance. From the assessment results, it is known that the preliminary design CBD Gedebage masterplan has already almost fully responded to the surrounding environment and existing land. The synthesis of a sustainability-based design approach is, to a minimum, change the existing ecosystem. If there is a change, extension must be made to the existing land/area so that its function can be replaced optimally.

References

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