• Vol 8, No 2 (2017)
  • Industrial Engineering

Eye Blink Rate as a Measure of Mental Workload in a Driving Task: Convergent or Divergent with Other Measures?

Ari Widyanti, Nisha Faradila Sofiani, Herman Rahadian Soetisna, Khoirul Muslim


Publish at : 29 Apr 2017 - 00:00
IJtech : IJtech Vol 8, No 2 (2017)
DOI : https://doi.org/10.14716/ijtech.v8i2.6145

Cite this article as:
Widyanti, A.., Sofiani, N.F.., & Soetisna, H.R..& Muslim, K.. 2017. Eye Blink Rate as a Measure of Mental Workload in a Driving Task: Convergent or Divergent with Other Measures?. International Journal of Technology. Volume 8(2), pp.283-291
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Ari Widyanti Laboratory for Work System Design and Ergonomics, Department of Industrial Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia
Nisha Faradila Sofiani Laboratory for Work System Design and Ergonomics, Department of Industrial Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia
Herman Rahadian Soetisna Laboratory for Work System Design and Ergonomics, Department of Industrial Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia
Khoirul Muslim Laboratory for Work System Design and Ergonomics, Department of Industrial Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia
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Abstract

Measuring mental workload requires both subjective and objective measurement. However, as existing objective measures lack applicability due to technical reasons and cost considerations, this study evaluates an easy to use and cost effective method of measuring the sensitivity of the eye blink rate as a potential objective measure of mental workload. Eight participants were instructed to operate a driving simulator in a lab setting and complete a series of driving tasks set at three different levels of difficulty. The completion time and penalty scores were recorded as the performance measures. The eye blink rate data were analyzed as an objective measure, and the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) was used to assess the participants’ mental workload at the end of each task as the subjective measure. Although the completion time, penalties, and NASA-TLX increased as the difficulty level of the tasks increased, the eye blink rate decreased. The implications of these results are discussed.

Blink rate; Driving simulation; Mental workload; NASA-TLX